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By providing a full postcode (such as W1A 1AA), national grid reference (for example SE123456) or latitude, longitude pair (like 54, -0.5) this page will provide a map, terrain plot and detailed information of the location showing the UK and RoI television transmitters that it is possible you receive Freeview, Freeview HD, Youview, BT TV and Saorview from.
 

(Don't know your postcode? Find it at Post Office Postcode finder).

UK Free TV uniquely shows you transmitter coverage maps, aerial to transmitter terrain plots, the closest 10 mobile phone masts (for possible 4G-at-800 interference) as well as tabulated information (sorted by direction, by received signal strength, by frequency, by service names or by transmitter name).

Sample prediction images

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See sample prediction pages


Click on these links to see how this page looks with these sample postcodes: TR50PB, SA108RP, DH50PJ, DL147RD, BA128LH, DL77SR, B632NX, NR78HJ, RM53LJ, NR86LU.

Please note

These predictions are based upon a rooftop aerial and depend on the suitability of the aerial, the distance to the transmitters, the power of their signals, the postcode area, and local terrain.

Comments
Wednesday, 4 November 2020
C
Chris.SE
sentiment_satisfiedGold

1:04 AM

Tracey:

Hi, sorry I didn't spot your previous posts until now.
First lets deal with these aerial elements. The "squashed X" profile tends to be aerials with higher gain for the number of elements.
Vertical or Horizontal - If the squashed part of the X is horizontal, in other words it's wider than it is high, that's horizontal.

You said your rods are vertical - did you mean that?
Are the surrounding aerials at the same sort of height as you?
The fact that you are high up means you are generally likely to have a good line-of-sight, may have a stronger signal than those lower down (but not absolutely always) and the signal is less likely to have too may fluctuations.

Those strength, quality and BER figures you've posted are very good, BUT I'm staggered they are as good as that if your aerial rods really are vertical, they should be horizontal for Winter Hill. If the polarisaton is incorrect that could explain the variation in severe weather. (On a side note, the strength figures aren't necessarily definitive, different sets may give slightly different figures, but what it indicates is there is adequate signal, the fact that the Quality is 100% and the BER (Bit Error Rate) is zero shows the signal is excellent).

As far as the UHF channel data on the Winter Hill page, I'm afraid the site owner has not updated it all correctly with all the 700MHz clearance changes (there are many other transmitter pages similarly incorrect I'm afraid, but in a lot of cases there are fairly recent posts listing the correct information). The channel numbers I quoted in my previous post are the correct ones and if you hover your mouse over those numbers (which have the C in front of them) it tells you the frequency for the channel. Also where a channel number is shown with a + or - , the frequency is offset by 167kHz - and a lot of sets round the figure so you might see eg. 585.8 instead of 585.833 BUT IF a channel had an offset + or - the hover doesn't show the offset frequency!! Hope that hasn't got too technical for you, if you want me to explain it more clearly if you haven't followed that, let me know.

Another aside, there's another "local" multiplex for Manchester, the G-MAN/GI multiplex (you may have spotted on the Freeview Channel Listings page) that's on C27. The Coverage Checker doesn't predict any coverage of that one for you - but, you never know, the checkers aren't always right!

So if you can come back on those points, we should know what's needed next!

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Chris.SE's 1,831 posts GB
T
Tracey
8:04 AM

Chris.SE:
Apologies Chris, no idea why I said Vertical, they're single bar horizontal elements (I must have re-read my post 10 times before I hit send and never spotted that one)! The houses around us are at similar heights and their 'x' elements are wider than taller, so horizontal too, and yes we have a clear uninterrupted view in the Winter Hill direction (although the mast itself isn't visible from any view point I can access, but I guess at that distance it's to be expected).
The G-MAN/GI multiplex on C27 does indeed appear, with signal strength 38%, quality 100%, error 0% (that's with this morning's fairly good weather).
Your frequency explanation made excellent sense, thank you, and I've re-checked my results against your values, and apart from the rounding up my set does, they're all in agreement. Interestingly, my TV has a 'Signal History' menu which 'displays the Channel numbers that were saved when the signal strength was weak'. I've manually re-scanned some of these but haven't found any increase on the 90%'s I was seeing before.
I hope I've answered your points without 'flipping' the information this time! I can't help but wonder why the fitter would use this aerial when from his vantage point he would see at least 7 other aerials (that's just the other side of the road, viewable from my lounge) that have more elements, and in some cases the 'x' type as well. His cabling along the front of the house is very neat, suggesting he takes pride in the finished appearance of his work, so why choose what would seem to be a 'marginal' aerial? (rant over).
Thanks again for your invaluable assistance and apologies for the red herring!

link to this comment
Tracey's 6 posts GB
Tracey's: mapT's Freeview map terrainT's terrain plot wavesT's frequency data wifiT's R&TI Service businessT's digitaluk trade radioT's DAB coverage
Thursday, 5 November 2020
C
Chris.SE
sentiment_satisfiedGold

5:07 AM

Tracey:

Quote > His cabling along the front of the house is very neat, suggesting he takes pride in the finished appearance of his work, so why choose what would seem to be a 'marginal' aerial? (rant over).

Penny pinching cheapskate?? :O Seriously, it depends on who did the job, was it a professional installer, or an amateur one where the person who did it may not have appreciated the differences in aerial gains.
It's a shame you haven't got any strength and quality figures (I'm assuming) from the past when reception was poor.

Two things I did mean to mention, first was that there are now no offsets on any of Winter Hills UHF channels, when the final 700MHz clearance took place in August, the channel moves were to the exact frequencies.
2nd, it's possible that "some" of your poor reception in the past may have been due to "Tropospheric Ducting" which sometimes occurs with High Pressure weather conditions resulting in interference from distant transmitters in Europe or the UK as signals travel further. See https://www.radioandtvhelp.co.uk/help-guides/television/effect-of-tropospheric-ducting-on-freeview for a simplistic explanation. There is unfortunately some predicted to be around over the next few days which "might" affect reception.

As far as problems when it rains heavily, if you know someone who can go up and look at your aerial to make sure water is not getting into the connections and cable, that would be a good idea, but I would want to see what happened to the Strength and Quality figures in the bad weather before venturing up there if it's a bit awkward (ie. need a proper roof ladder etc.). That said, as I mentioned in a previous post, if you have receipts if it was a professional installer, you could try a gentle moan at him and suggest he should come to check the installation as reception degrades significantly in heavy rain which it shouldn't.

The figures you've given are very respectable and probably about right for the transmission mode & power of the respective channels relative to one another (The main 6 muxes are the same power, COM7 is lower power, as are the Local muxes which are also beamed in specific directions).

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Chris.SE's 1,831 posts GB
T
Tracey
6:57 AM

Chris.SE:
Thanks again Chris. I'll question the previous owner a little more on their choice of installer and see if they have any paperwork to hand. No, unfortunately I don't have any strength and quality figures from the past when reception was poor, the relevant TV menus hadn't been found at that stage. Interesting read on the tropospheric ducting (an interesting looking website in general - I shall read further). As you suggest, I need to wait now for the weather to re-produce the problem and gather more data then. This being Glossop, that shouldn't be far away. I'll report back when I have further information. Thank you for the help, it's been most interesting working through this with your aid.
Tracey.

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Tracey's 6 posts GB
Tracey's: mapT's Freeview map terrainT's terrain plot wavesT's frequency data wifiT's R&TI Service businessT's digitaluk trade radioT's DAB coverage
C
Chris.SE
sentiment_satisfiedGold

7:28 AM

Tracey:

No problem, look forward to hearing how it goes.

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Chris.SE's 1,831 posts GB
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