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How would you cut £613m from the BBC budget?

UK Free TV is making it possible for you to decide what to cut and what to keep. Use the tick boxes to select what you would cut from the BBC budget, and see your progress in the bar below. Please share!!!

KJavascript required!
PickNameCostReach*
Broadband rollout "topsliced" to BT£150.0m-
BBC One£1,433.6m45.3m
BBC Two£533.4m32.0m
BBC Three (online only)£20.0m-
BBC Four£63.1m10.6m
 
CBBC£100.3m3.6m
CBeebies£41.1m5.8m
BBC ALBA£9.0m-
BBC News channel£63.0m8.8m
BBC Parliament£10.1m0.7m
 
BBC Radio 1£54.3m10.4m
BBC Radio 2£60.4m15.1m
BBC Radio 3£55.1m1.9m
BBC Radio 4£115.7m10.6m
BBC Radio 5 Live£66.1m5.3m
 
BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra£5.7m1.6m
BBC 1Xtra£11.1m1.0m
BBC 6Music£12.5m2.1m
BBC 4 Extra£7.5m2.0m
BBC Asian Network£10.7m0.6m
 
BBC Local Radio (England)£153.8m6.1m
BBC Radio Scotland£31.4m0.9m
BBC Radio nan Gaidheal£6.0m-
BBC Radio Wales£19.9m0.4m
BBC Radio Cymru£18.3m0.1m
 
BBC Radio Ulster/BBC Radio Foyle£24.0m0.5m
BBC Online, iPlayer (and Red Button)£201.0m-
Orchestras and performing groups£32.5m-
S4C (inc direct funding)£107.0m0.6m
Development spend£82.8m-
 
BBC World Service operating licence£253.6m210.0m
Licence fee collection costs£110.3m-
PSB Group pension deficit reduction payment£376.8m-
Costs incurred to generate intra-group income£170.2m-
Costs incurred to generate third-party income£133.4m-
 
Restructuring costs£8.4m-
Digital switchover (DSHS Limited)£0.4m-
Local TV£2.9m-

Notes: this page is based on the figures in the BBC Full Financial Statements 2014/15, less the change of BBC Three from £114.2m TV to £20m online service. Full Financial Statements also shows the current number of governement-funded 'Over 75s' licences - 4,215,808 - giving the eventual shortfall of £613.4m. BBC Worldwide/BBC America profit of £109m to BBC 'PSB Group' and one-off £78.6m for 'lease reclassification' also not shown. The 'Reach' is the number of people tuning into the service each week, from BARB Viewing Summary and RAJAR Quarterly Listening.

Comments
Tuesday, 13 September 2016
M
MikeB
4:30 PM

Classic FM's playlist tends towards the 'Worlds Greatest Classical CD', which is fine for a while, but challenging its not, and its film music tends to be a bit from John Barry (I'm a huge Barry fan, but there are only so many times you can hear 'Out of Africa'), the really boring Howard Shore music from one of the Rings films (they tend to blend into one), and Ladies in Lavender.

R3 isn't easy listening, but there is a lot of good stuff you just wont hear on Classic FM, even though its (small) audience complains of 'dumbing down'. And there is no way that Classic FM would cover the Proms - far too obscure.

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MikeB's 2,107 posts Platinum Platinum GB
Sunday, 16 October 2016
J
James Livingston
6:39 PM

How much do the regional variations of BBC 2 cost and what is the reach?

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James Livingston's 11 posts GB
Monday, 17 October 2016
Mark A
7:47 PM

Re; James Livingston.
The England BBC2 regions closed down when analog TV ended.
If they closed down the BBC2 SD and HD versions of BBC2 for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland,
then they would save the costs of 3 HD and 3 SD channels on satellite.

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Mark A's 339 posts Gold Gold GB
Saturday, 18 February 2017
I
Ian
3:05 PM

I would get rid of the whole BBC and therefore the TV license fee, and restart the BBC as a commercial business as it is not right that the British public are forced to pay for a service they may or may not want.
The BBC could change to a pay per view or subscription only service, then we will see just how much of the BBC programs are actually wanted, and if people would be willing to pay for them.
Of all the channels we have now, I probably watch maybe only five short BBC TV series each year, and if I could opt to pay for only what I watched, an would probably do without them.

I think it is very unfair to be forced to pay for so little.

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Ian's 3 posts GB
MikeP
7:42 PM

Ian:

Even if there were no BBC there would still be a legal requirement to pay for a TV receiving licence! Even if you use a computer to watch or only ever view 'catch up'services you still need the licence. Only part of the funds raised equate to the sum paid by Government to the BBC. All the money collected initially goes into the Treasury 'pot' and then the Government doles out what it deems they want to pay to various organisations, such as DfID, MoD, Home Office, DEFRA and eventually the BBC.



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MikeP's 1,357 posts Gold Gold GB
Sunday, 19 February 2017
D
Dave
9:30 AM

Incorrect Mike P - You do NOT need a TV licence to watch catch up services OTHER THAN BBC I player!!

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Dave's 18 posts GB
M
MikeB
11:34 AM

Dave: Wrong. You need a TV licence to receive live transmissions or services which stream live. As the TV Licencing website explains:

'You must be covered by a TV Licence to download or watch BBC programmes on iPlayer - live, catch up or on demand. This applies to any device and provider you use.
Don't forget, you still need a TV Licence to watch or record programmes on any channel as they are being shown on TV or live on an online TV service.'

Any channel as they are being shown on TV or live on a online TV service - which covers the other broadcasters as well.

As for Ian's orginal points, they are anything but original, and have been consistently debunked (which sadly, does not stop people saying exactly the same things over and over again).

Have a look at Brianist's excellent series of articles, such as BBC 2017 BBC 2017: Which of these 14 options is best to collect 4 billion quid a year? or his more recent ones of BBC cuts, etc.

How exactly could the BBC move to a subscription or pay per view system? Every single Freeview (and Freesat) receiver would have to be replaced with one which would have the capacity to block BBC services unless a fee had been paid (and such boxes do not yet exist) The cost of those boxes, and administering that system would be huge - Brianist has cited the figure of 25% of Sky revenue is taken up in such a way, so how do you suggest the BBC could do so? Brianist wrote a whole articlehttps://ukfree.tv/article/1107052194/BBC_2017_The_problem_with_turning_Freeview_into_Pa about the problems involved - if you can do better, let us know!

If people were paying a licence fee, but nobody watch or listened to the BBC, you might have a case, but BBC1's weekly reach is close to 90% of households, and some 93% or more of other BBC services in total. Radio, net, news - all part of the mix - and people who say they never use the BBC are either very very unusual, or they are lying.

And want to know what happens when people have the BBC withdrawn in an experiment? They did it last year for 9 days (just Google it) - even the bulk of the ones who didn't want to pay the licence fee or felt it was too much had changed their minds after just over a week, and were pretty surprised by the relatively low cost for what they got.

You claim to only watch 5 short BBC series each year. However, what about the rest of the household? What about BBC news? Radio? Website? Apart from the cost of administering micropayments, think how much you'd pay over the length of a year for those service, being charged per hour (and thats if you could be - radio?). Currently, your paying ?2.79 per week, all in. Watch 5 hours a week in total, and thats 52p an hour. How much does Netflix/Amazon/Itunes/Google Playstore charge per hour watched?


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MikeB's 2,107 posts Platinum Platinum GB
MikeP
7:20 PM

Dave:

the law was changed last year, I think, so that ANY viewing whether live or catch-up on any device, even a smart phone, requires a Broadcast Receiving Licence.

Please check you fact first. I am absolutely certain of my statement having worked in the TV industry for over 50 years and been a Special Constable too.

Check before opening ***.



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MikeP's 1,357 posts Gold Gold GB
S
StevensOnln1
7:43 PM

MikeP: You are incorrect in your assertion that all catchup services require a TV licence. This was proposed, however the commercial broadcasters opposed it and the final position that came in to force last September is that a TV licence is required to view any programs on BBC iPlayer or to view live (or as broadcast) streams on other catchup services, however no TV licence is required to view catchup programs on other services after the time they have been broadcast.

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StevensOnln1's 571 posts Gold Gold GB
Saturday, 25 February 2017
D
David
3:12 PM

You only need a TV license if you watch or record live broadcasts or view the BBC iPlayer service. No license is needed for watching ITV iPlayer, All4 or Demand 5 or any streaming service catch up services at present.

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David's 18 posts GB
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