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What price for an aerial installation?

What prices have you been quoted and paid for an aerial installation?

What prices have you been quoted and paid for an aerial install
published on UK Free TV

In responses to the guideline I posted about how much having a new aerial fitted should cost, Ian Grice posted: "£40-£50? Every aerial fitter I contacted wants at least £150+VAT considering you can get a class 3 aerial for under £10 and a class 2 for under £15 and cable is 40p a metre why are they charging so much for 30 minutes work?"

OK, for some places putting up a TV aerial is hard work, such as multi-story properties. As many people will simply be exchanging a Group A, B, C/D, E or K aerial for a wideband type, often without changing the supporting pole or cable, a high price cannot be justified.

I am concerned that some companies will exploit vulnerable groups (such as the elderly).

So, I what prices have you been quoted for aerial installations? What price have you paid for installation?

Do you know of any companies to avoid? Do you know of any companies that are good value for money?

Or do you work for a great aerial installation company?



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Comments
Tuesday, 5 July 2011
I
Ian
sentiment_satisfiedSilver

5:14 PM

Nick Waring, all you are doing is creating 'Another 'Middle' Man', why would successful aerial installers want a middle man when all you probably want is a cut of their installer takings.

I look on people like you as leaches.

link to this comment
Ian's 170 posts GB
Wednesday, 6 July 2011
P
pmullans
1:51 PM

I've recently had an aerial fitted (£180) on a single story extension behind the house, and my neighbour has complained that it spoils their view. We also have an aerial on the main house, and the house is in a conservation area.
They have contacted the local council planners, who have given them guidance. They say the aerial should have a maximum dimension of 60cm and should not extend above the ridge line of the building.
I asked the aerial fitter to come back and have a look, and he said he can't get an aerial that small (and if he could, it wouldn't give a very good signal), and that every aerial he has fitted for the last ten years must be illegal, and every aerial on surrounding houses must be illegal, so he refuses to do anything. I can see his point.
I called the council planning department, who say it's my problem...
Has anyone met this situation before? Can anyone offer any advice?


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pmullans's 4 posts GB
M
Mike Dimmick
sentiment_very_satisfiedPlatinum

2:28 PM

pmullans: Yes, TV aerials just don't come that short. See ATV`s Choice Of Aerials for digital TV for some example dimensions. That site doesn't list 'contract'-type aerials, which might be short enough, but might not give good enough performance - it depends where you are.

I do find that aerial installers tend to overdo it, fitting aerials that are way too big. Their tendency to use wideband aerials where they are not necessary causes size inflation too, because you can use a much smaller grouped aerial for the same amount of gain, particularly in the lower frequency groups.

A grid or billboard aerial is a possibility, particularly if your region has already switched over.

You could also try splitting the output of the aerial on the main house - to which I presume there are no objections! - and distributing that to the other location. You might need a small amplifier to offset the loss through the splitter and in the additional cable. If your region has not yet switched over, I would recommend using a separate amplifier and splitter, rather than a powered splitter, so that you can remove the amplifier after switchover if it is no longer necessary.

link to this comment
Mike Dimmick's 2,486 posts GB
P
pmullans
3:54 PM

Thanks Mike - very useful information and much appreciated!
P

link to this comment
pmullans's 4 posts GB
S
steveh
sentiment_satisfiedBronze

5:20 PM

pmullans, i think the council have got their wires crossed and are talking about the regulations about satellite dishes. when sky started over 20 years ago their dishes needed to be 60cm so that was the size deemed acceptable. most councils nowadays turn a blind eye in these days of bigger polish dishes etc unless some busybody complains

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steveh's 23 posts GB
P
pmullans
5:55 PM

I think you're right, but the booklet from the government website ("A householder's planning guide for the installation of antennas, including satellite dishes") seems to include TV aerials.

However, I've now found a planning officer at the local council who seems willing to give an opinion, and he basically said to ignore the regulations, as they would never prosecute anyone over a TV aerial..!

Thanks for all your help.
P

link to this comment
pmullans's 4 posts GB
M
Mazbar
sentiment_satisfiedGold

7:10 PM

Hi pmullins i had this problem with the local planning department and a problem neighbour. The set size for a tv aerial is normaly 95 cm not 60 you could apply for planing permition. Being in a conservation area could work in your favour if you could make it seam as you are replacing like for like you dont have to pay for the planing. They will take a look at the aerial and if it has been hiden as best as your aerial rigger could do you should be ok they dont normaly care what your neighbour thinks hope everything is ok. By the way why didnt your rigger put a masthead amp on your main aerial and run extra coax to your extention this could have saved you any problem.

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Mazbar's 381 posts GB
P
pmullans
8:07 PM

That would have been a good solution, but he didn't suggest it, and I didn't have the knowledge to think of it.
Thanks!
P

link to this comment
pmullans's 4 posts GB
KB Aerials Sheffield
sentiment_satisfiedSilver

10:01 PM

I once had a next door neighbour demand i removed an aerial as the lashing wire was on his half of the chimney! WTF

link to this comment
KB Aerials Sheffield's 274 posts GB
Thursday, 7 July 2011
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