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Saffron Green (Greater London, England) analogue radio transmitter

sa_gmapsGoogle mapsa_bingBing mapsa_gearthGoogle Earthsa_gps51.665,-0.243 or 51°39'54"N 0°14'35"W


UK Free TV shows the coverage area for a radio transmitter as a coloured overlay (orange for FM, other colours for DAB) on the grey map. We have computed the coverage by combining the terrain with the official radiation pattern. A single click will select the transmitter to view the coverage for a single site, and a double click goes to a page showing full details. Click on the buttons in the right-hand corner of the map to choose from different frequencies (or multiplexes for DAB).

This transmitter has no current reported problems

The BBC and Digital UK report there are no faults or engineering work on the Saffron Green (Greater London, England) transmitter.

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Saffron Green analogue radio transmitter
LBC London News  1152kHz  , Gold  1548kHz 

What do the map symbols mean?

 FM/AM radio mast.

Other local maps

Saffron Green AM/FM DAB in Greater London AM/FM in Greater London

Comments
Friday, 16 September 2016
MikeP
10:21 AM

Vlada Babuska:

You are very lucky to be able to receive a Medium Wave transmission from the London area all the way across the continent in Prague. Such transmissions are not intended to be reliably receivable that far away, so fading, etc is to be expected.



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MikeP's 1,137 posts Gold Gold GB
Saturday, 17 September 2016
M
Michael
4:57 PM

MikeP: I've picked LBC up in northern france clear during the day time there some hotspots'on the continent,however this transmitter is focused on london the signal takes a substantial drop to barely audible near Tring Herts to the north.

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Michael's 1 post GB
Sunday, 18 September 2016
MikeP
10:42 AM

Michael:

None of that changes my answer. MW transmissions are not intended to be receivable outside of the service area. That they often can be is a matter of physics. Tropospheric ducting/temperature inversions often occur during high atmospheric pressure and hot weather, and are usually experienced with UHF signals - but they do affect lower frequency signals too. Radio Luxemberg was famous for fading in and out on their 208 metres transmissions - because of atmospheric effects.

Transmitter aerials are often designed to be directional so as to serve particular area(s) that would otherwise have little or no service.



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MikeP's 1,137 posts Gold Gold GB
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